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  • Controller joystick value calibration issue

    Using a regular Xbox Controller on the PC (no rewasd), any direct joystick direction (up, down, left, right) holds the 1.0/-1.0 values for a wige range around each axis. However, when mapping any controller using rewasd that range is much smaller and barely stays 1.0/-1.0. An example is as follows.

    This is a controller input when not using rewasd:

    Click image for larger version

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ID:	234836

    This is the same controller but instead emulating through rewasd:

    Click image for larger version

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ID:	234837

    Notice how the Axis 0 using rewasd that the max value of 1.0 is much smaller.

    The issue this causes in games like first person shooters is that the normally the camera moves faster at this max value but using rewasd it is really hard to hit it because 1.0 is at such a small point whereas not using rewasd it is larger and feels more natural. This is my experience using a console as well, that by default they have a larger range. It seems like rewasd normalizes these values or some auto-calibration but it isn't correct.

    Is there a way to fix this? This isn't really an outer deadzone because I am hitting the "max" values. It seems like the default driver in Windows extends past the normal range (dot is outside the circle), like a sort of overcalibration that isn't being emulated in rewasd.

    I tried both a normal xbox controller and a 8bit Pro Duo2 both with the exact same results.​

  • #2
    There is no way to "fix" this at the moment. But we have plans to on a feature that would resolve this issue. No ETA is set for it at the moment.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally Posted by redoctober45 View Post
      Using a regular Xbox Controller on the PC (no rewasd), any direct joystick direction (up, down, left, right) holds the 1.0/-1.0 values for a wige range around each axis. However, when mapping any controller using rewasd that range is much smaller and barely stays 1.0/-1.0. An example is as follows.

      This is a controller input when not using rewasd:

      Click image for larger version

Name:	image.png
Views:	238
Size:	6.3 KB
ID:	234836

      This is the same controller but instead emulating through rewasd:

      Click image for larger version

Name:	image.png
Views:	125
Size:	6.5 KB
ID:	234837

      Notice how the Axis 0 using rewasd that the max value of 1.0 is much smaller.

      The issue this causes in games like first person shooters is that the normally the camera moves faster at this max value but using rewasd it is really hard to hit it because 1.0 is at such a small point whereas not using rewasd it is larger and feels more natural. This is my experience using a console as well, that by default they have a larger range. It seems like rewasd normalizes these values or some auto-calibration but it isn't correct.

      Is there a way to fix this? This isn't really an outer deadzone because I am hitting the "max" values. It seems like the default driver in Windows extends past the normal range (dot is outside the circle), like a sort of overcalibration that isn't being emulated in rewasd.

      I tried both a normal xbox controller and a 8bit Pro Duo2 both with the exact same results.​
      Usas algún tipo de curva? podrías poner una imagen de como lo tienes configurado? yo siento que se mueve despacio y despues mucho, por lo tanto fallo las balas

      Comment


      • #4
        Hello

        I'm happy to inform you that reWASD added Squared Sticks settings for virtual controllers. You can check how it works right now​

        Comment


        • #5
          Miron4ik42 puedes explicar que han cambiado y que podemos hacer nuevo ahora, gracias!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Basically, choosing a square shape for the emulated stick allows you to get 100% input in diagonal directions, which you couldn't get with a round stick.

            We will add a more detailed description in our supporting articles soon.​

            Comment

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